HISTORY OF HEARTLAND BLACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

(Formerly known as Kansas Black Chamber of Commerce)

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The KBCC was founded by Mr. Leroy Tombs in 2004.  Tombs gained prominence as the owner of Tombs & Sons, which held federal contracts to provide food and maintenance services for military bases throughout the country. The Kansas Black Chamber (KBCC) is committed to developing and strengthening black businesses in the State of Kansas.  It is the goal of KBCC to provide resources to connect new and existing business to resources that promotes prosperous growth; growth that enables us as individual owners, and as a chamber to support our community.

In 2005, the KBCC officially opened and hosted a Grand Opening with over 500 businesses and community participants in attendance.

Membership within the chamber has grown to approximately 200 members with 40% plus registered as minority and disadvantaged business.  In May, 2012 the KBCC gained national support by becoming a member of the U.S. Black Chambers, Inc.  Daily the KBCC provides leadership with national support through urban business enterprise, procurement and construction contracting, professional development, employment training, workforce guidance, and leadership development.

On September 28, 2012 the KBCC launched the Urban Business Enterprise Center (UBEC).  The UBEC is an incubator program dedicated to the development and of M/W/DBE in Wyandotte County and in Kansas City, Kansas.

In 2013, the KBCC became a Workforce Investment Act provider for the State of Kansas which delivers industry specific workforce training in the areas of customer service and construction.

On April 28, 2015 the KBCC makes a significant move to become a regional chamber and announces its new doing business as name, the Heartland Black Chamber of Commerce.  Heartland will serve Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska and Iowa.

With a new name and brand,  national connections, and state affiliations, we can further our efforts of nurturing minority business and putting people to work that are otherwise unemployed.